curl err: Could not resolve host: 13cf3de235d7405dbeee0187511a2048.xyz Education burden in Dagoretti – Investigative Story by Tabitha Otieno – Action for Transparency

Education burden in Dagoretti – Investigative Story by Tabitha Otieno

 

A policy on Kenya’s Free Primary Education was implemented in January 2003, by the then president Mwai Kibaki. Enrolment to schools increased significantly, opening up opportunities for marginalised and disadvantaged communities from across the country to attend school.

Years’ later, the basic service still remains inaccessible to many children living in disadvantaged communities, locked out because schools are now slowly introducing illegal levies and fees.

Tabitha Otieno, famously known as Tebby, a journalist with Mtaani Radio, has published a story on the Education Burden faced by parents in Dagoretti area of Nairobi. In her investigative report through a grant from the Eye on Corruption project at Transparency International Kenya, Tebby reveals several cases where pupils have been asked to pay school fees of up to 4,000 KSH per term. Click below to listen to the story. This story was fist broadcasted at Mtaani Radio 99.9FM.

Tebby Otieno currently works at Mtaani radio as a reporter. She is a host in a four hour educative program on Saturday morning and a three hour entertainment program, with focus in Swahili (Taarab) songs on Sunday evening. Tebby is passionate in telling stories (Feature stories) about children through radio. She runs a blog  tebby254.blogspot.com where you can find more of her work.

 

About Eye on Corruption Project

Eye on Corruption Global Network Project-phase III, aims to train and mentor journalists, enabling them to investigate systemic corruption within the government that is affecting provision of basic services like health and education, where women, children and other disadvantaged groups would mostly bear the brunt.

The third phase of the Eye on Corruption (EoC) Global Network project (2018-2019) is being implemented in collaboration with the Action for Transparency team at  Transparency International Kenya (TI-K) and Fojo Media Institute, with continued support from Creative Force (Swedish Institute).